Debunking the recent Celiac pill hype

By Sue Newell, CCA National Office Staffer

Sue Newell

Sue Newell

It would have been hard to miss the news from the University of Alberta over the last few weeks: Scientists find enzymes that break down gluten so celiacs can eat pizza and beer! If you just read the brief news reports, it all sounded great. It would be great if it was true. Right now, it is a “good idea, hope it works, looking forward to hearing the results of your trials a few years from now”. Unfortunately, that doesn’t make good headlines.

There are a number of potential drugs in the formal drug testing pipeline to add to the current treatment for celiac disease. Some CCA members have already taken part in the trials. There are many more ideas floating around that theoretically have a good chance of working. None of them are on the market yet and all need more rounds of formal testing before they could ever be approved by Health Canada.

There is one type of product on the market right now. Gluten Ease, Gluten Cutter, Gluten Aid, Gluten Relief; all the names sound so promising. The only problem is they don’t make gluten safe for someone with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. When you read the literature on the products, they clearly say “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration”. In other words, we have not had to prove that the pills do what we say they do.

When there are treatments to augment the gluten-free diet, you will hear about it from the CCA, not from the popular press. There might even be options that will replace the gluten-free diet as a treatment, but that is a very long way down the road from now. In the mean time, we are lucky to have an amazingly effective treatment that allows us to actually get better. I’m not sure there are any other autoimmune diseases with that treatment.

New Gluten-Free Bread At Nature’s Fare

Chapter President Irene Wiseman recent had an opportunity to try a new bread product that is now available at Nature’s Fare Markets.

The loaf is from Little Northern Bakehouse and comes in three flavours: Mllet & Chia, Cinnamon & Raisin, and Seeds & Grain.

As you know, Irene is the go to person in our chapter on bread. She’s done commercial baking for Nutter’s and other private customers. She also tries out the products on her B & B guests.

Irene says she likes it and that it works well for sandwiches and does not need to be toasted. Irene will have some coupon’s at September’s Potluck.

If you are looking for a new bread – check it out!

little northern bakery
Click for a PDF info sheet.

Gluten-Free Beach Picnic Today at 5 pm!

gf-pop-up picnic

Selena Devries, RD, CLT and Integrative Registered Dietitian via www.healthbean.ca is holding this fun (free) gluten free picnic at Rotary Beach in Kelowna TODAY!  It’s perfect for family and young ones!

Below is the full write-up.  Hope to see you there!


The theme of this event is “Eating Out.” Selena Devries, Registered Dietitian and diagnosed celiac will be giving a short talk on how to stay safe when trying to eat out gluten free.

She will also be available to chat to throughout the event and answer questions on the gluten free diet.

It’s a FREE event for everyone of all ages. Family, friends, and children all welcome. This is an event intended to support those with celiac disease and/or gluten intolerance in our community. Following a gluten free diet can be socially isolating so let’s come together and support each other!

Please bring some GLUTEN FREE snacks/dishes that you would like to eat/share. If you intend to share them, please come with a written out ingredient list of what is in your dish. Note, it is not required to share your dish.

You do NOT need to bring food to attend this event.

This is a GREEN event: Please bring your own eating utensils/bowls.


If you can make it, please RSVP on Facebook to help us plan the food: https://www.facebook.com/events/1605585463044925/

Celiac Awareness and Information Conference in Kamloops!

pathway to health Canadian Celiac Association Logo

Celiac Awareness and Information Conference

Presented by

Canadian Celiac Association –  Kamloops Chapter

Saturday September 26, 2015

Calvary Community Church, 1205 Rogers Way, Kamloops BC  V1S 1R9

Keynote Speakers

 

Dr. Kraig Montalbetti, M.D. Family Physician

“A Celiac’s relationship with their Physician”

Dr. Ali Kohansal, MD Gastroenterologist

“The Celiac Diagnosis”

Dr. Justine Dowd, PhD –

            Post-doctoral Fellowship at the University of Calgary

“Importance of a strict adherence to a Gluten Free diet”

Dr. Richard Lewis, M.D. F.R.C.P (C) Dermatologist

“DH – The truth behind the Rash”

Selena De Vries, RD  –

HealthBean Nutrition

“Safe Eating and Label Reading for the Celiac and the Gluten Sensitive”

Jim Motokado, Pharmacist

“What your Pharmacist needs to know after diagnosis”

Sarina Bruno

            “Growing Up Celiac – a Child’s Perspective”

Adam Hart – Author & Nutritional Researcher –

            The Power of Food and Ra Energy Co Creator

“Whole Health Eating for Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity”

Visit kamloopsceliac.org to register.

Hempola Hemp, Protein & Fibre Powder recalled due to undeclared gluten

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Hempola brand “100% Hemp Powder, Protein & Fibre Powder” recalled due to undeclared gluten

hempolaRecall date: June 16, 2015
Reason for recall: Allergen – Gluten
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Hempola Valley Farms
Distribution: British Columbia, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario
Extent of the distribution: Retail
Reference number: 9886

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Hempola 100% Hemp Powder, Protein & Fibre Powder 454 g BEST BY 250117 6 23188 78935 4
Hempola 100% Hemp Powder, Protein & Fibre Powder 5 lb BEST BY 250117 6 23188 78935 4

Gluten Free Popup Picnic – July 23rd

gf-pop-up picnic

Selena Devries, RD, CLT and Integrative Registered Dietitian via www.healthbean.ca is holding this fun (free) gluten free picnic at Rotary Beach in Kelowna on July 23rd. Perfect for family and young ones!

Below is the full write-up.  Hope to see you there!


The theme of this event is “Eating Out.” Selena Devries, Registered Dietitian and diagnosed celiac will be giving a short talk on how to stay safe when trying to eat out gluten free.

She will also be available to chat to throughout the event and answer questions on the gluten free diet.

It’s a FREE event for everyone of all ages. Family, friends, and children all welcome. This is an event intended to support those with celiac disease and/or gluten intolerance in our community. Following a gluten free diet can be socially isolating so let’s come together and support each other!

Please bring some GLUTEN FREE snacks/dishes that you would like to eat/share. If you intend to share them, please come with a written out ingredient list of what is in your dish. Note, it is not required to share your dish.

You do NOT need to bring food to attend this event.

This is a GREEN event: Please bring your own eating utensils/bowls.


If you can make it, please RSVP on Facebook to help us plan the food: https://www.facebook.com/events/1605585463044925/

Can I eat the strawberries that have been grown in wheat straw?

By Sue Newell, CCA National Office

There’s wheat straw in that field

strawberriesI know when strawberry season hits across the country because I start seeing variations on this question: “The farm has straw between the rows of strawberries. Can I still eat the berries?”

The short answer is: go ahead and eat the strawberries. Wash them first. Watch out for mold.

Straw is the dried stalks of a grain plant (usually barley, oats, rye, or wheat) after the grain and chaff have been removed. Grains are the seeds of the plant which grow in a head at the top of the plant. Grain is the only part of the plant that contains gluten. Chaff is the thin, dry, scaly husk around the grain. Straw is harvested after the grain has been removed.

“But what if there are some grains left in the straw?” is usually the second question. A few grains might be mixed in, but grain is much more valuable than straw so as much grain as possible is removed before the straw is left to dry. Any remaining kernels often fall off during straw harvest and are left behind in the field. Those that might make their way to the strawberry field will tend to fall to the ground because of their weight. They are slower to dry then the stems so even if they break, the moisture will prevent much material from flying around.

Will the gluten end up in the strawberries? No. Plants take in hydrogen, oxygen, water, and minerals from the soil and use those basic elements to build the various structures the need. Strawberries do not absorb complex chemicals like proteins directly.

So why do some people get sick when they eat strawberries grown in straw? I wonder if it is related to more gray mold (actually a fungus, Botrytis cinerea). Most berries have some spores on them, but if the straw traps moisture, mold growth can be accelerated. Straw also contains a variety of mold and fungus spores that may contribute to the problem, if you are sensitive to those allergens it might appear that you are reacting to the strawberries.

Savory Strawberry Dishes

When somebody says strawberry and savory together, I instantly think of a salad with dark lettuce, strawberries, pecans, balsamic vinegar and some sort of dressing. I like those salads, but as someone with celiac disease, salads are what you eat when nothing else is safe. Not the right way to celebrate juicy ripe strawberries that were attached to a plant that morning.

Here are a few recipes I’ve come across recently that use strawberries to create a more interesting gluten-free option for supper.