M&M Meat Shops Gluten-Free Product List

Thanks to member Michelle McFetridge who recently got this email reply from M&M Foods and shared it with us.

m-m-logoCurrently, a “gluten-free products” search is not available on our website. We hope to have this feature available soon. You can search for all of the M&M products that do not contain gluten using our filtered search & drop down menus. I would like to offer some information on our allergen protocols and some of the tools that we have in place to assist our customers who have allergies or sensitivities in making their food choices.

Customers with dietary restrictions, especially related to food allergies, sensitivities and intolerances, represent a growing portion of our customer base. In order to serve these customers better, we realize that accurate information on all ingredients in our food products, beyond the standard label declaration, is needed. With this in mind, we have requested of all our suppliers to search their ingredients for any sources of the eleven food ingredients commonly known to cause allergic reactions or sensitivities. The eleven food ingredients are peanuts, tree nuts, crustaceans/shellfish, fish, milk, egg, gluten/wheat, soy, sulphites, sesame and mustard. Their individual responses have been compiled into our Product Information Manual. As well, if the manufacturer identifies a significant risk of cross contamination with one of these ingredients, it is identified as present in our listing for that M&M product.

The M&M Gluten Free products (23) bearing the oval orange flash “Gluten Free” are specially made in facilities operating under gluten-free certification. Some of these products are:
Boneless Pork Chunks (172), Breaded Chicken Fillets (185), Country Style Chicken Breasts (207), Bacon Wrapped Chicken(208), Chicken Chunks ‘n Wings (286), Homestyle Mashed Potatoes (412), Cheddar Cheese Stuffed Potatoes (511), Gourmet Stuffed Potatoes (512), Broccoli and Cheese Stuffed Potatoes (513), TOO TALL® Chocolate & Cream Cake (619).
I have contacted our supplier for Fried Potatoes to clarify the processing steps and I will contact you again when I have additional information.

Consumers can use the nutrition and allergen search from their computers on our public website at http://www.mmmeatshops.com/en/home To access this nutrition and allergen search can be found on the ‘home’ page under the “NUTRITION & ALLERGEN INFORMATION” block in the middle of the page. You will be redirected to a page where you will have an option to do a filtered search. Select “ingredients to avoid’ and ‘gluten”. Our web site provides the nutritional information and allergen information for our more than 450 products, although complete ingredient listings are not available. We have approximately 164 products that do not contain gluten ingredients. For your convenience I have attached a list of our products that do not contain gluten.

DOWNLOAD PDF: M&M products that do not contain Gluten – December 2015

 

 

Eat Ancient Grains for more Nutrients

By CCA National

Our gluten-free diets tend to be heavy in white flour and starches that don’t contain a lot of nutrients.

Over the last few years, there has been a lot more interest in ancient grains which generally contain more nutrients. There are a number of suppliers of these grains, including Pure Organic Foods, a member of the Gluten Free Certification Program who not only choose only the best grains but also package them right there in South America, to reduce the possibility of contamination.

There are many web sites offering novel recipes to use these grains. Here are a few to get you started.

Amaranth

QuinoaQuinoa

Millet

Pick a Grain

Celiac & Gluten Intolerant Wellness Group January 28th

Mary Hicks

Thursday night, January 28, 2016 we have our Kelowna Celiac and Gluten Intolerant Wellness Group with Mary Hicks, our Dietitian.

When: 7-8 pm
Where: Interior Health, Capri Centre Mall, Kelowna, 118 – 1835 Gordon Drive, Room 3,

Free to CCA members, $2 donation for non-members.  It’s 7 pm to 8 pm at the Capri Health Centre (118 – 1835 Gordon Drive) meeting room three with parking available at the back by Capri insurance.

Contact Mary Hicks 250-717-3639 for more information.

What does “May Contain” mean?

Courtesy CCA National

may contain labelThere is a lot of misunderstanding about what May Contain means when it shows up on a food label in Canada. The two biggest misconceptions are that 1) it is simply a legal disclaimer used to reduce getting sued, and 2) that it must be used whenever there is a gluten source present in the plant. Neither of these things is true.

May Contain is a VOLUNTARY statement in Canada. Manufacturers can choose whether or not to use it on their packages. There is no requirement to use them and there is no prohibition against using them. The only requirements are that they be truthful and that they are not a substitute for Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). Good Manufacturing Practices are not a set of “thou shalt” statements, they are a series of general principles that must be observed during manufacturing to make sure that products are safe for consumption and are produced in controlled conditions that prevent cross-contamination with allergens or other hazardous ingredients.

To quote Health Canada, “Precautionary labelling should only be used when, despite all reasonable measures, the inadvertent presence of allergens in food is unavoidable. It must not be used when an allergen or allergen-containing ingredient is deliberately added to a food. Furthermore, the use of a precautionary statement where there is no real risk of an allergen being present in the food is contrary to the Department’s goal of enabling a variety of safe and nutritious food choices for the allergic consumer.” Source: The Use Of Food Allergen Precautionary Statements On Prepackaged Foods.

Cruising Gluten-Free to Rio De Janiero

by Irene Wiseman

Feliz Navidad y Bueno Neuvo Ano

These are just a couple of the new Spanish phrases I heard on numerous occasions, during our 5-week cruise from Los Angeles to Rio De Janiero, embarking on December 3rd and concluding January 6th with our arrival back in Salmon Arm.

When translated of course this means Merry Christmas and a Good New Year.

Holidays, so precious to take, and yet when we compare our standards and living conditions to other countries we realize how fortunate we are to live in this great Country of Canada. Although both Clarence and myself have in past years traveled to various spots on the globe, neither one of us had really traveled thousands of miles by ship and visited 10-different countries in such a short period of time.

star princess shipI must admit it was exciting planning, getting ready and taking that first flight to California which allowed us to board The Star Princess, a ship in the Princess Fleet which holds in excess of 3,000 passengers and 1,200 crew.

The Festive Season is family time and I must admit although we enjoyed this type of trip once, we both had a tear in our eye as Christmas Eve arrived. I did manage to sit on Santa’s knee and we had a great dinner and celebration evening with other guests and crew.

The first few stops included Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Lima, Peru. Although the number 13 can often be a bad omen, for us it was not so. That number we will always remember as the date we CROSSED THE EQUATOR – something special for wayfaring seamen and of course a necessary celebration was the Order of the Day. The ritual not solemn, as one might expect but more like a rite of passage into a Fraternity House at your favorite University.

The willing passengers who participated in the rite will never forget. We were fortunate enough not to have been selected for those embarrassing moments.

Some passengers did take the opportunity at the Lima, Peru port to take a 3-day excursion to the famed Machu Pichu. We elected to wander the streets of this wonderful city. This as well gave Clarence an opportunity to practice his “street smart Spanish”, something that saved us pesos and also allowed us to have a more intimate tour with a local cabbie rather than the sterile organized City Tour which in most cases always places you on the wrong side of the tour bus for taking photos.

Map_of_South_AmericaThe next two countries on our list were Chili and Argentina. South American countries have one thing in common, and that is Spanish invasion and eventual revolutions. The central squares in all the major cities have the many statues of their revolutionary leaders, churches and government buildings. In Chili in the Port of San Martin we discovered we were quite close to the Nasdaq Plains, an archaeological site worth visiting but we were on a time restraint. Rather than do that, we elected to wander and discovered their national drink called the Pisco Sour. Feeling that was worth experiencing we followed suit with such “tastings” in both Argentina and Brazil.

We found the South Americans very friendly. In one port, an ambitious young man trying to make it in the tourism industry, latched onto us and wanted to show us the various sites in this very small port. He was practicing his English as much as Clarence was his Spanish. What was very evident at the end of his half hour with us, was that he expected nothing in return for sharing his local knowledge. We even had to “call him back” for his tip (or as they say in Spanish – his propina).

The architecture in all of the cities was most striking and in many cases buildings had been erected many hundreds of years ago and survived numerous earthquakes.

The next two milestones in the trip were going around Cape Horn the bottom of South America. We were aware that seas in the area can be rough and we did have a taste of that prior to arriving at the Cape with 3-days of chop and swell. Captain Stefano Ravera played this period of time on the side of caution and cut throttle to about 10 knots and dodged in and out of channels which gave us shelter from the wind and waves. But the day we rounded the tip of the continent mother nature treated us with kindness – calm winds and sunshine.

Clarence did discover that having “rounded the cape” he was now entitled to wear an ear ring in his left ear. He says likely in another life.

After Cape Horn we had a two day trip to The Falkland Islands. Although the war with Argentina happened over 20-years ago there still seems to be some sensitivity about this period of history with the two countries. We managed to visit a Penguin Colony here which was indeed a highlight of the trip in some cases standing within a couple feet of these unusual birds.
The last three cities we dropped anchor at were Buenos Aires, Montevideo and Rio De Janeiro. They all have their uniqueness and of course Rio will host the Olympic Games this August. We did manage to take a cable car up to the highest peak in Rio, which is Sugar Loaf Mountain and also visited the famous Ipanema and Copacabana beaches. Although time did not permit us to take the rail car up to the famous Christ The Redeemer, the cross is visible from most areas in the city of 12 million people.

As a Celiac it was also interesting to note that in Rio many of the major manufactures do label products as gluten-free or containing gluten even water had a no gluten label. This was my clue as to how to figure out just what had gluten in it. The restaurant also had a menu in English. We had a couple of meals sitting at our outdoor restaurant with the ocean and Ipanema beach right across the street. It can’t get any better than that.

Princess Cruises also caters very professionally for anyone with food allergies. I talked to the head waiter and learned that they are very careful and know just how important the food prep is.

An amazing journey – 31 days on the Cruise – total distance covered 11,300 statute miles, 10 countries and 18 bottles of red wine. Irene and Clarence’s trip of a life time.

Don’t listen to bartenders – barley beer isn’t safe

by CCA National Office

For many people, bartenders have become experts about gluten in beer. After all, they are educated by brewery representatives who have a job selling beer, not those dietitians and doctors who seem to just make your life miserable and unfulfilling! In the past month I have been told by CCA members and other celiacs that at least 12 different mainstream beers are “OK for people with celiac disease”.

Despite the obvious appeal of listening to those bartenders, there are a few problems with their analysis:

  1. beer-not-gluten-freeSymptoms are not a good indicator of the absence of gluten in a product.
  2. Beer is not distilled so the proteins are not removed from the grain ingredients – including malted barley.
  3. We do not have verified technology to measure the amount of gluten in beer. That means that a gluten test might give you a number but we have no way to know if that number is correct, or if it might be significantly underestimating the amount of gluten in the beer.
  4. As per Health Canada, any product containing barley or malt directly added is not allowed to be called “gluten free”.

Gluten from barley is the hardest type of gluten to detect on a test. In beer, where the barley proteins are broken into pieces, detecting the “bad” part of the proteins is even harder. The conventional tests will give you a number for the amount of gluten in a beer sample, but there is no way to verify that number. Studies that use mass spectroscopy to look at the broken pieces of barley proteins have found gluten in all barley-based beers. This research article gives details if you would like to read more.

Some manufacturers use an enzyme that is supposed to break the gluten sequence in beer into pieces so that it won’t trigger a gluten reaction. This treated beer that is “Crafted to remove gluten” and sold in Canada must carry a statement that indicates that there is no way to accurately measure the amount of gluten in beer. I saw this message on a bottle of Daura Damm at the LCBO store yesterday. It was on the label around the neck of the bottle in very tiny print.

End result, the CCA does NOT consider beer made with gluten as safe for people with celiac disease, treated to remove the gluten or not. Beer is one of those things that does not meet the gluten-free criteria, just like wheat-based bread isn’t safe. There are alternatives that are not really the same (just like with bread). You either get used to them or you stop eating bread. The same rule applies for beer.