Celiac disease and the gluten-free diet found unlikely to impact IVF outcomes or fertility

Here’s yet another reason why those without celiac disease or gluten sensitivity do not need to follow the gluten-free diet. Research presented in October by the Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey (RMANJ) indicates that the gluten-free diet is not effective as a treatment for infertility. The findings are combined from 30 different scientific studies.

While healthy eating, including a low-carb diet, is part of a holistic, evidence-based approach to treating patients with infertility at RMANJ, adhering to a gluten-free diet has been shown to have no impact on increasing fertility for those trying to conceive.

The studies are the first large research projects to investigate IVF outcomes in gluten-free patients and the frequency of celiac disease in infertile patients.

One study found that patients on a gluten-free diet had equivalent IVF success rates to those whose diet included gluten, proving that maintaining a gluten-free diet to improve IVF outcomes is a major misconception.

The other study revealed that IVF success rates were equivalent between those with celiac disease (a disease with proven gluten intolerance) and those without.

More info: https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/
gluten-free-ivf-new-research-from-reproductivemedicine-associates-of-new-jersey-reveals-glutenfree-diets-and-celiac-disease-are-unlikely-to-impact-ivf-outcomes-or-fertility-for-those-trying-toconceive-300545215.html

About Mark Johnson

Mark Johnson lives in Ottawa and has served on the CCA Board of Directors since 2011. Mark works on the CCA’s awareness, revenue and education initiatives, and as such is involved with such tasks as writing, editing, internal communication, media relations, member support, advertising, and social media. Mark also serves as president of the CCA’s Ottawa Chapter. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Waterloo, and master’s degrees from the University of Ottawa (communication) and Carleton University (political management). Mark was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2005. He is a federal public servant, is married with two dogs, and in his spare time enjoys travelling, learning, reading, and playing

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