Celiac Disease in the News – December 2018

by Val Vaartnou

The following are summaries of research in progress or completed from credible medical journals and medical sites. Links are provided where further information can be found.

Celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis linked A large analysis of more than 35 million patients found an intriguing connection between celiac disease and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Out of the 15,000 patients in a database pulled from 360 U.S. hospitals who had been diagnosed with EoE, 2 percent also had celiac disease.

The numbers translate into a likelihood nine times larger of finding celiac disease in a patient with EoE compared to a patient in the normal population.

For more information: https://www.allergicliving.com/2018/06/07/whats-the-link-betweeneoe-and-celiac-disease/


Prebiotics can help celiac symptoms Research published in the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology found that a 6-week probiotic treatment is effective in improving the severity of IBS-type symptoms in celiac disease patients on strict GFD, and is associated
with a modification of gut microbiota, characterized by an increase of bifidobacteria.

For more information: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29688915


Viruses can lead to activated celiac disease A growing body of research suggests that viral DNA or proteins introduced into the body can contribute toward the development of serious diseases long after the initial viral infection has passed. And now, research by a team from
the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital shows that exposure to the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), best known for causing mononucleosis, appears to boost the risk of developing seven other diseases in individuals who inherited predisposing gene variants – including celiac disease.

For more information: http://www.iflscience.com/healthand-medicine/the-virus-that-causes-mono-linked-to-sevenautoimmune-diseases/


Questioning the link between antibiotics and celiac In contrast with existing research, a recent study published in the journal Jama Pediatrics found that antibiotics taken during a child’s first four years of life were not associated with the development of celiac disease or type 1 diabetes, even if the child was genetically predisposed to the development of either condition.

For more information: https://mykidsfoodallergies.com/isthere-a-link-between-childhood-antibiotic-use-and-celiacdisease/


Celiac disease can indeed strike anytime in life From childhood to late life, diagnosis of celiac disease is critical and should not be ignored. That’s the message for patients and healthcare providers from two recent studies.

In the first, researchers from Italy concluded that the number of patients with celiac disease worldwide is increasing, “thanks to better environmental conditions that allow children with celiac disease to survive longer.” In the second, scientists from Finland and the United Kingdom found that one in four celiac disease diagnoses is made in people 60 years or older. Still, 60 percent of patients remain undiagnosed because their symptoms, including tiredness, indigestion and reduced appetite, are blamed on older age itself.

For more information: https://www.beyondceliac.org/research-news/ViewResearch-News/1394/postid–106300/


Gluten-free food not so gluten free in Melbourne

A first of its kind study led by Institute researchers and City of Melbourne environmental health officers has detected potentially harmful levels of gluten in foods sold and served as ‘gluten-free’ across Melbourne, Australia. The undercover study revealed one in 11 samples of ‘gluten free’ food tested were contaminated with gluten at levels that could prove harmful to people with celiac disease.

For more information: https://www.wehi.edu.au/news/illuminate-newsletter/june-2018/melbourne-gluten-freestudy


US study finds restaurant gluten-free food not always gluten-free

Based on more than 5,600 gluten tests over 18 months, the investigators determined that 27 percent of gluten-free breakfast meals contained gluten. At dinner time, this figure hit 34 percent. The rise could reflect a steady increase in gluten contamination risk as the day unfolds, the researchers said.

For more information: https://www.webmd.com/digestivedisorders/celiac-disease/news/20181008/study-somegluten-free-restaurants-fall-short#1


Ensuring dietary compliance among children and teenagers

New research on children and adolescents with celiac disease examined their dietary habits to determine the factors responsible for non-adherence to a gluten-free diet.

Compliance with the diet is difficult at all ages but particularly for teenagers due to social, cultural, economic, and practical pressures.

For more information: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5775619/

About David Fowler

David Fowler is an online marketing consultant specializing in AdWords PPC, SEO, and website updates. He is the webmaster of Kelowna Celiac and was co-chair of the Kelowna 2012 CCA National Conference in Kelowna.

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