Vinh Thuan Rice Flour for Cake recalled for Gluten

Vinh Thuan brand Rice Flour for Cake

CFIA Alert

Vinh Thuan brand Rice Flour for CakeFood Recall Warning (Allergen): Vinh Thuan brand Rice Flour for Cake recalled due to undeclared gluten
Reason for recall: Allergen – Gluten
Hazard classification: Class 3
Company / Firm: Thai United Food Trading Ltd.
Distribution: Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan
Extent of the distribution: Retail
Reference number: 11858
Size: 400 g
EXP: 30/08/2018 8
Product UPC: 934734 212038

Japanese Rice Cakes recalled due to undeclared wheat

Canadian Food Inspection Agency News Releasewismettac logo

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Japanese Rice Cakes recalled due to undeclared wheat
Recall date: April 7, 2017
Reason for recall: Allergen – Gluten, Allergen – Wheat
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Wismettac Asian Foods
Distribution: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec
Extent of the distribution: Retail
Reference number: 11318

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
N/A (Japanese Characters Only) Japanese Rice Cakes (Kashiwa Mochi Sk Br.) 250 g All codes where wheat is not declared on the label 4 903226 102106 &
0 74410 70824 5

Frying wheat products does not make them gluten-free

Canadian Celiac Association New Release

April 3, 2017 (Mississauga, ON.) The myth that frying wheat products makes them gluten-free is endangering people with Celiac disease.

gluten-free fryerPeople often liken the frying process to cooking an egg. In the case of an egg, frying it changes the colour and structure of the egg. While heating gluten in a fryer does change the structure of the gluten protein, it does not make it safe for someone with Celiac disease.

Heating wheat to 65°C (140°F) unwraps the three-dimensional structure of the protein, like it does for eggs, but that is not enough to prevent an immune system reaction for someone with Celiac disease.

The trigger for the gluten reaction in someone with Celiac disease is a very short peptide chain within the larger protein. Peptides are chains of amino acids that make up a protein. The only thing that will break the peptide chain apart and make gluten safe for people with Celiac disease is a complete breakdown of the chain into its component amino acids.

“These peptides are extremely difficult to break apart – they are designed to resist the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract,” explains Sue Newell of the CCA.

There is some question about the exact temperature for this complete breakdown, with a suggestion that heating the food to 315°C (600°F) for 30 minutes may be sufficient. At that point, however, the food is inedible.

The Canadian Celiac Association recommends that people with Celiac disease and gluten sensitivities avoid any food cooked in oil has also been used for wheat-based products.

Kismet Brand Methe Powder Recalled

By The Canadian Food Inspection Agency

A recall has been added to the CFIA’s Food Recall Report.

Class: 2
Reason for Recall: Allergen – Wheat
Product(s): Kismet brand Methe Powder (Fenugreek Powder)
Recalling Firm: New Generation Foods
Distribution: British Columbia

Product details are available at: http://inspection.gc.ca/about-the-cfia/newsroom/food-recall-warnings/complete-listing/2016-10-06-r10937/eng/1476887702311/1476887705387

 

Beware of Barley Malt Containing Beverages

malt barley root beer

Courtesy CCA National

malt barley root beerToday is one of those hot hazy summer days when not much sounds better than sitting beside the pool and enjoying an “adult beverage”, that is, something with alcohol in it.

This year, the range of beverages that do not contain gluten is larger than ever before thanks to the popularity of ciders, hard root beer, and what the industry likes to call “one pour” or “ready-to-drinks” beverages.

The concern is that you need to determine if there is gluten in the form of barley malt in the product based on its category. Hard root beers are a good example: Crazy Uncle has no gluten ingredients; Mad Jack is a combination of a regular lager beer (containing gluten) and root beer. Nearly all of the ciders contain no gluten but a few include barley malt. Holy Crow Bruised Apple Cider Ale tells you right from its name that it contains gluten.

If you live in or near Quebec the problem gets even worse. Some beverages sold at the SAQ (Quebec liquor stores) are fine but the beverage with the same name sold at Costco has malt added to it. In Quebec, only malt beverages can be sold in alternate outlets like Costco and corner stores.

The solution is to extend the motto “read every label every time” to “read the ingredient list ON THE BOTTLE YOU ARE ABOUT TO CONSUME every time”. A bother? Yes. Worth it to keep yourself safe? Absolutely.

Don’t Listen to your Bartender

beer-not-gluten-free

By CCA Board of Directors
For many people, bartenders have become experts about gluten in beer. After all, they are educated by brewery representatives who have a job selling beer, not those dietitians and doctors who seem to just make your life miserable and unfulfilling! Over a period of four weeks we were told by CCA members and other celiacs that at least 12 different mainstream beers are “OK for people with celiac disease”.

beer-not-gluten-freeDespite the obvious appeal of listening to those bartenders, there are a few problems with their analysis:

  • Symptoms are not a good indicator of the absence of gluten in a product.
  • Beer is not distilled so the proteins are not removed from the grain ingredients – including malted barley.
  • We do not have verified technology to measure the amount of gluten in beer. That means that a gluten test might give you a number but we have no way to know if that number is correct, or if it might be significantly underestimating the amount of gluten in the beer.
  • As per Health Canada, any product containing barley or malt directly added is not allowed to be called “gluten free”.

Gluten from barley is the hardest type of gluten to detect on a test. In beer, where the barley proteins are broken into pieces, detecting the “bad” part of the proteins is even harder. The conventional tests will give you a number for the amount of gluten in a beer sample, but there is no way to verify that number. Studies that use mass spectroscopy to look at the broken pieces of barley proteins have found gluten in all barley-based beers. This research article gives details if you would like to read more.

Some manufacturers use an enzyme that is supposed to break the gluten sequence in beer into pieces so that it won’t trigger a gluten reaction. This treated beer that is “Crafted to remove gluten” and sold in Canada must carry a statement that indicates that there is no way to accurately measure the amount of gluten in beer. This message has been seen on bottles of Daura Damm in Ontario. It was on the label around the neck of the bottle in very tiny print.

End result, the CCA does NOT consider beer made with gluten as safe for people with celiac disease, treated to remove the gluten or not. Beer is one of those things that does not meet the gluten-free criteria, just like wheat-based bread isn’t safe. There are alternatives that are not really the same (just like with bread). You either get used to them or you stop eating bread. The same rule applies for beer.

Mannarich Food and Parker Lee brand fish products recalled

Recall date: February 26, 2016
Reason for recall: Allergen – Crustacean/Shellfish, Allergen – Egg, Allergen – Milk, Allergen – Soy, Allergen – Wheat
Hazard classification:  Class 1
Company / Firm: Mannarich Food
Distribution: British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Possibly National, Quebec
Extent of the distribution: Retail

Recall details

Ottawa, February 26, 2016 – Mannarich Food Inc. is recalling Mannarich Food and Parker Lee brand fish products from the marketplace because they contain crab, egg, lobster, milk, soy and/or wheat which are not declared on the label. People with an allergy to crab, egg, lobster, milk, soy or wheat should not consume and retailers, hotels, restaurants and institutions should not sell, serve or use the recalled products described below.

The following products have been sold in British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec and may have been distributed in other provinces.

These products may have been sold in bulk or in smaller packages with or without a label and may not bear the same product names as described below. Consumers who are unsure if they have purchased the affected products are advised to contact their retailer.

Recalled products

Brand Name Common Name Size Code(s) on Product UPC
Mannarich Food Hot Pot Assortment – Taste of Japan 400 g All codes where crab, lobster and soy are not declared on the label 0 68636 31102 0
Mannarich Food Seafood Crispy Beancurd 4 x 3 kg All codes where egg is not declared on the label None
Parker Lee Japanese Style Udon Noodle with Seafood 470 g All codes where crab and egg are not declared on the label 0 68636 21061 3
Parker Lee Thai Style Rice Noodle with Seafood 470 g All codes where egg is not declared on the label 0 68636 21062 0
Parker Lee Portuguese Sauce Seafood Rice Bowl 375 g All codes where crab and milk are not declared on the label 0 68636 02016 8
Parker Lee Seafood a la King with Spaghetti 450 g All codes where crab, egg and wheat are not declared on the label 0 68636 20122 2

What you should do

Check to see if you have recalled products in your home. Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased.

If you have an allergy to crab, egg, lobster, milk, soy or wheat, do not consume the recalled products as they may cause a serious or life-threatening reaction.

Background

This recall was triggered by CFIA test results. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

Illnesses

There have been no reported reactions associated with the consumption of these products.

Frozen Fish Dumpling recalled due to undeclared gluten

Food Recall Warning (Allergen) – Hai Pa Wangbrand Frozen Fish Dumpling with Cuttlefish recalled due to undeclared egg and gluten

ai Pa Wang brand Frozen Fish Dumpling with CuttlefishRecall date: December 11, 2015
Reason for recall: Allergen – Egg, Allergen – Gluten
Hazard classification: Class 2
Company / Firm: Uncle T Food
Distribution: Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario

Ottawa, December 11, 2015 – Uncle T Food Ltd. is recalling Hai Pa Wang brand Frozen Fish Dumpling with Cuttlefish from the marketplace because it contains egg and gluten which are not declared on the label. People with an allergy to egg or gluten should not consume the recalled product described below.