Election Meeting Tomorrow – Save Kelowna Chapter

Join us tomorrow for what could be our last Kelowna Chapter meeting ever.

The meeting will be held at the Seniors’ Activity Centre, located next door to the Winfield Arena, 9832 Bottom Wood Lake Road, Lake Country, Winfield. We precede our meetings with a 12:00 potluck lunch at a cost of $2. per adult (17 years and older) to cover the cost of hall rental and coffee. Those attending are asked to bring their favourite gluten-free dish (and the recipe for all to see). Our potluck lunches are a wonderful opportunity to discover new recipes and realize that gluten-free eating does not mean sacrifice or boredom.

Elections will be the focus of the meeting. All of our executive is stepping down as each has served for many years (some 10+ years). We are asking members to fill the following positions: PRESIDENT, TREASURER, VICE PRESIDENT, SECRETARY. These positions need to be filled as of December 30th. You would only need to commit to holding two meetings per year. If you wish for the website to remain running after April 1st, a new webmaster must also step forward.

Please consider taking on these positions. The current executive will help you get started. Any questions please feel free to contact Irene Thompson 250-832-7738 or email [email protected] for more information. You can also contact any of the other members of the executive on our contact us page.

If a Product Does Not Contain Gluten Ingredients, Why Isn’t It Labelled Gluten-Free?

The Canadian Celiac Association Answers the Facebook Question of the Month

Why doesn’t procduct X have a “gluten-free” claim on it? There are no gluten ingredients listed.

CCA LogoIn Canada, not having gluten ingredients is just one of three criteria for a gluten-free claim. The other requirements are that the food must meet the criteria of a food for special dietary use and it must not contain gluten from uncontrolled contamination in the ingredients or manufacturing process.

A food for special dietary use is “… a food that has been specially processed or formulated to meet the particular requirements of a person a) in whom a physical or physiological condition exists as a result of a disease, disorder or injury;”. In other words, a gluten-free food must be specifically made for someone with celiac disease.

A jar of jam may not contain any gluten ingredients but it cannot be labelled “glutenfree” unless the manufacturer takes specific steps to confirm that there is no gluten.  Because a product must meet all three of these requirements to make a “gluten-free” claim, there are many products on the market that are safe for someone with celiac disease, even though they do not carry a gluten-free claim.

Low Risk
Some of these products are essentially unprocessed including fresh fruit, vegetables, seafood, dairy, and meat. Others are products where no gluten ingredients are used in most or all of the products in the category including jams and jellies, butter, yogurt and cheese.

High Risk
There are some products that are at a higher risk for gluten contamination. The CCA recommends that you look for a “gluten-free” claim on those products. They include baked goods, breakfast cereals, flour and nuts. For lower risk products, we recommend that you make your decision based on the ingredient labelling information provided on the package.

One Week Left To Save Kelowna Chapter

volunteer in kelownaKelowna Chapter members have just one week to save the chapter.

On November 4th elections will be the focus of our chapter meeting. All of our executive is stepping down as each has served for many years (some 10+ years).

We are asking members to fill the following positions: PRESIDENT, TREASURER, VICE PRESIDENT, SECRETARY. These positions need to be filled as of December 30th. You would only need to commit to holding two meetings per year. If you wish for the website to remain running after April 1st, a new webmaster must also step forward.

Please consider taking on these positions. The current executive will help you get started. Any questions please feel free to contact Irene Thompson 250-832-7738 or email [email protected] for more information. You can also contact any of the other members of the executive on our contact us page.

Our November 4th meeting will be held at the Seniors’ Activity Centre, located next door to the Winfield Arena, 9832 Bottom Wood Lake Road, Lake Country, Winfield. We precede our meetings with a 12:00 potluck lunch at a cost of $2. per adult (17 years and older) to cover the cost of hall rental and coffee. Those attending are asked to bring their favourite gluten-free dish (and the recipe for all to see). Our potluck lunches are a wonderful opportunity to discover new recipes and realize that gluten-free eating does not mean sacrifice or boredom.

If you want the chapter to continue in 2019, we need volunteers to step forward NOW. The time commitments are minimal and it’s a great way to give back to the Celiac community.

Distilled Liquors: Are they Gluten-Free?

By  Val Vaartnou

I responded to an info line question requiring Grey Goose Vodka and whether it was glutenfree. I gave the standard response to the query that as vodka was a distilled alcoholic beverage like rye whiskey, scotch whiskey, gin and vodka they are distilled from a mash of fermented grains. Rum is distilled from sugar cane. Brandy is distilled from wine and bourbon is distilled from a grain mash including corn. Since the distillation process does not let the proteins enter the final product, distilled alcohols are gluten-free. (CCA Pocket Dictionary).

The individual asking the question said that after talking with a fellow celiac, he had been told this could not be true, as ingesting vodka causes significant celiac symptoms in his friend. I forwarded this to Sue Newell who provided this thoughtful response. I thought I would share it you as it may explain issues you may have with distilled alcohols.

I know I don’t have to tell you that not every reaction is due to gluten. Alcohol is rarely consumed in isolation from food, but somehow the alcohol always get the blame! In addition to alcohol, the other component that survives distillation is congeners. These are the flavouring agents and other components that are light enough to be carried in water vapour or that convert to gas at a lower temperature than the boiling point of water.

Most congeners are innocuous but some are rather nasty, including small amounts of chemicals such as methanol and other alcohols (known as fusel alcohols), acetone, acetaldehyde, esters, tannins, and aldehydes (e.g. furfural). If someone has a sensitivity to any of these items, they can show a variety of reactions and depending on the dose, can become quite ill. Usually, the first 5% of distillate is discarded to get rid of some of these substances. When you hear about alcohol that has been distilled multiple times, it is to
remove some of these compounds.

Different grains have different types and levels of congeners. As a result, it is possible for people to react to one brand but not another.  I can almost guarantee that this correspondent is not going to believe this information. That is common and is one of the reasons why so many rumors continue to exist.

Thanks Sue for your always knowledgeable response.

Best Foods to Stock in Your Kitchen

by Val Vaartnou

food-potluckSo you’ve been diagnosed with Celiac Disease and you worry that there will be nothing to eat because “everything” contains gluten. Yes, gluten does lurk everywhere, but there are great foods that you can enjoy and get the added benefits of reducing your inflammation in the body while eating for your health.

Keeping it simple is one of the first recommendations that I make to anyone diagnosed with Celiac Disease. Eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables in as many colors as you can find and eating lots of lean meats is the best start. Your kitchen staples should include staples that are readily available to give you a varied diet.

Note: Grain, nuts, and seeds have the most risk of cross-contamination from gluten of all foods. In the field, during processing and packaging, the processes must be monitored to ensure gluten does not contaminate them. Ensure the manufacturer has marked grains, nuts, and seeds as gluten-free on the packaging.

Dairy products are fine unless you are also lactose intolerant. Aged cheeses and low sugar yogurts, especially greek yogurts are less problematic. Goat yogurts and cheeses are sometimes good alternatives.

Fresh fruits: In the winter, pomegranates, apples, pears, bananas, and in my freezer for smoothies, frozen berries (raspberries, blueberries, cherries and blackberries!). During the summer, visit the farmer’s market and enjoy the fresh fruits of the season.

Fresh herbs: like ginger, turmeric, chives, parsley, cilantro, rosemary, and basil. I cook with them and throw them in my salad, too. Cilantro and parsley are great as they help to detoxify the body.

Fresh veggies: Spinach, chard, kale, arugula, beets, broccoli, cauliflower and brussel sprouts. radishes, jicama, scallions, and fennel for my salad. Again the farmer’s market is great to pick up fresh local vegetables.

Healthy fats: Avocado, olives, oils (avocado, coconut, olive), ghee (check out online recipes to make your own), seeds (chia, hemp, flax, pumpkin or sunflower seed), full-fat coconut milk.

Healthy grains: Quinoa and wild rice are my favorites. Try some different grains for variety, for example, millet, teff, and sorghum. If you are very strict on your gluten-free diet and still find your symptoms continue, you may find that the elimination of all grains is required. Eliminate them all for a few weeks and then reintroduce each grain, one at a time, eating it daily for a few days. Listen to your body and your symptoms. You may find you can tolerate some grains better than others.

Healthy proteins: Turkey, chicken, salmon, sardines, mung beans, adzuki beans, lentils (again marked gluten-free by the manufacturer), hummus (chickpeas).

Healthy snacks: Whole nuts and seeds, or nut butters (cashews, almonds, Brazil, macadamia, coconut, sunflower, walnut), nori (seaweed), 70% or higher dark chocolate.

Spices and condiments: Cinnamon, cumin, curry powder, coriander, turmeric,
ginger, black pepper, sea salt and dried herbs.

Pantry staples: canned beans (chickpeas, kidney, and black), canned tuna and salmon, gluten-free minimally-processed crackers (Mary’s Gone Crackers for example), artichoke hearts, sardines.

Gluten-free processed foods are fine for treats but should not be the foundation of your diet. Unfortunately, gluten-free foods are often high in fats, sugars, and salt so reading the nutritional label is always required, not just to ensure there is no gluten, but to ensure that you are not eating empty calories.

We Need New Executive Members To Keep Kelowna Chapter Going

volunteer in kelowna

By Irene Thompson, President Kelowna Chapter

volunteer in kelownaThe Executive of the Current Executive of the Kelowna Chapter have each served in their present positions for many years and wish to step down.  It is now time for new members to take on the following positions in order for this chapter to continue to serve our members in 2019.

At the November 4th. meeting we will be asking members to fill the following positions: PRESIDENT, TREASURER, VICE PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, these positions need to be filled as of December 30th.  The Chapter can function with just a President, Treasurer, and Secretary. You would only need to commit to holding two meetings per year.

Please consider taking on these positions. The current Executive will help you get started. Any questions please feel free to contact Irene Thompson 250-832-7738 or e mail [email protected] for more information. You can also contact any of the other members of the executive.

I am leaving this decision up to the members to support this chapter and its members. This is not an Executive decision it is all up to you as members.

 

Gluten-Free Wellness Group Meets Wednesday September 26, 2018

selena-de-vries

Wednesday night, September 26, 2018 our Kelowna Celiac and Gluten Intolerant Wellness Group with Registered Dietitian, Selena De Vries meets.

When: 7 – 8 pm

Where: Orthoquest Kelowna Kinesiology at 1021 Richter Street, Kelowna, BC

Cost: Free to CCA members, $2 donation for non-members.

Topic: Theme is family friendly, gluten-free recipes for back to school/work and gluten-free holiday strategies (Thanksgiving and Halloween).  As always, we address any questions that come up in these meetings.  At this session, we will also take a vote for topics for the upcoming group sessions.

Contact Selena at 778-990-6047 for more information.

Action Needed By Sept 14: Write Govt On New Beer Labelling Regs.

gluten-free-beer

gluten-free-beerThe Government of Canada is proposing to amend the compositional standards for beer and ale, stout, porter and malt liquor. Their aim is to modernize the Food and Drug Act to recognize the new variations of beer, flavourings and preparations.

In addition to this review, the Government is also recommending to require beer manufacturers to declare allergens including gluten on their product labels.

As the voice for people adversely affected by gluten, the Canadian Celiac Association, with assistance from the Professional Advisory Council, has submitted its response in support of the proposed amendments. View our response here.

Pour on the support by September 14.

Why do we need your help?
During amendments to the regulations in 2010, the beer lobby was very effective in influencing politicians and bureaucrats to not be included in regulations requiring declarations of allergens or gluten on their labels or products. They were exempt. Now eight years later, the government is now proposing to remove this exemption.

The Government of Canada needs to hear from concerned consumers who are impacted by these regulations. The more people and groups who submit official responses, the more likely the amendments will be implemented.

Step one: Click here to download a template letter.
Step two: Add your name and address
Step three: Submit by email to: [email protected] by September 14 using the subject line: Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 152, Number 24: Regulations Amending the Food and Drug Regulations (Beer) – June 16, 2018
Step Four: Tell us you sent a letter by emailing us at [email protected]

BONUS STEP!
Step Five: Donate to CCA to allow us to continue to be your advocate in Ottawa and across the country for the right to safe gluten-free food. Donations can be made securely online, via CanadaHelps by clicking here.

Thank you for your help and support!

CCA Publishes Management of Bone Health Paper

The Professional Advisory Council of the CCA has written a paper on bone health. It’s now been published and will become one of our standard resources. It’s also 6 pages long, so here are the key points.

  • Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disorder that affects bone structure. It requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD), and long-term monitoring of patients with CD should include assessment of bone health.
  • Bone health assessment in CD with malabsorption requires bone mineral density (BMD) testing at diagnosis. Correction of malabsorption of calcium, phosphate, and vitamin D should be ensured. At the time of diagnosis, patients should receive counselling on a GFD and on the nutrition required to restore bone health. Intake of calcium and vitamin D should be optimized using dietary sources, whenever possible. Patients should be encouraged to participate in weight-bearing exercises, limit alcohol intake, and avoid cigarette smoking.
  • Evidence for management of low BMD and prevention of fractures in CD is limited. Strict adherence to a GFD seems to be the only effective treatment to improve BMD in adults with CD and decrease the risk of fractures.

If you would like to read the whole paper, you can find it at http://www.cfp.ca/content/cfp/64/6/433.full.pdf

Question: Can I get a safe food list from the CCA?

Answer:

Many people would prefer to use a list of safe products instead of reading ingredient lists.

The CCA has made a specific decision not to put out safe food lists, and we strongly urge Canadians to avoid them too. We worked very hard with Health Canada to get to the point where the information is present on the package. Because of this work, you are looking for four words: wheat, rye, barley, and oats.

gluten-free-listYour responsibility is reading every label every time you buy a product looking for those four words. Reading labels might seem like an overwhelming task, but here’s a tip – if you can’t pronounce an ingredient name, it doesn’t contain gluten. Ingredient lists use common names for gluten sources.

Some U.S. organizations produce safe lists and this is because of different regulations, barley and rye sources may be hidden in other ingredient names. It’s important to note that the U.S. lists are not correct for products sold in Canada. Just because a product has the same name in the U.S. and Canada does not mean that the ingredients are the same. If you want an example, search for “Smarties” and look at the images. You will see two completely different candies in Canada and the U.S.

If you have a question you’d like answered, email [email protected]