Childhood Respiratory Infections Linked With Celiac Disease

Findings published recently in the journal Pediatrics reported that the number of at-risk children – or those with relatives who have celiac disease – who go on to develop celiac disease seems to be increasing. And recently, Dr. Renata Auricchio, from the University of Naples Federico II in Italy, set out to understand why this might be the case.

Studies have pointed toward infections in childhood as a potential trigger of celiac disease in those who are genetically susceptible. For instance, a 2013 study found that the presence of rotavirus antibodies could predict the onset of celiac disease.

Similarly, in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, children who had experienced 10 or more infections before reaching the age of 18 months had a significantly increased risk of developing celiac disease than children who had had four or fewer.

Many earlier investigations into infections and celiac disease relied on parental recall of infections and have included a general cross-section of the population. However, to gather more detailed information, the new study used a prospective cohort. In other words, the team studied a group of infants known to be at risk of developing celiac disease and followed them for 6 years.

As the authors explain, the study’s aim was “to explore the relationship between early clinical events (including infections) and the development of CD [celiac disease] in a prospective cohort of genetically predisposed infants.

Across the study, 6 percent of the children were diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of 3, 13.5 percent at age 5, and 14 percent by age 6. They also found that “[c]ompared with gastroenteritis, respiratory infections during the first 2 years of life conferred a twofold increase in the risk of developing CD [celiac disease].”

When discussing how early infections might impact the later development of celiac disease, the authors write:
“It is possible that […] early infection stimulates a genetically predisposed immune profile, which contributes to the switch from tolerance to intolerance to gluten.”

More info: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319702.php

Gluten-free Baby: When Parents Ignore Science

different-foods

Key points from Maclean’s January 11, 2017 article

By Toronto Celiac

different-foodsChildren raised eating only a raw, vegan, non-GMO, unprocessed diet get a rude awakening when they enter school and find a whole new world of food: jello, fruit loops and many other foods have never been seen before. Dietitians agree that diets can be dangerous for children.

“Once you start restricting food groups or large chunks of food groups, you start running into problems like vitamin and mineral deficiency.” Karen Kuperberg, RD states that “In general, any diets for kids aren’t recommended. You want kids to eat a variety of foods from all food groups.”

Dr. Peter Green, an expert in Celiac Disease, is all in favour of going gluten-free if it’s medically required. Parents should not self-diagnose themselves or their children however. Parents who are committed to diets do have the advantage of paying close attention to what their children eat. However, the article warns that imposing adult lifestyle choices on infants and children is ill-advised.

Alternative medicine choices for children may mean undiagnosed serious diseases are being missed. “You cannot afford to make any mistakes when it comes to your children.”

If you know someone putting their child on a gluten-free diet as they seem to be bothered by gluten, suggest that before they do that, that they have their child tested for Celiac Disease first. If diagnosed, they can then get the proper information from a Registered Dietitian to ensure that vitamin and mineral deficiency does not become an issue. Their child’s health is at risk.

Read the full article at: http://www.macleans.ca/society/health/gluten-free-baby-when-parents-ignore-science/

Parents of Celiac Children Online Survey

study-logosWe need parents willing to complete an online survey:

Exploring the influence of parent perceptions on vitamin supplementation practices in children/adolescents with celiac disease.

parent-study-photoWe would like to gain an understanding of what your general knowledge is about the need for vitamin supplementation in children/adolescents with celiac disease and your perspectives on the factors which influence the decision to use/not use vitamin supplements.

  • Does your child/adolescent have Celiac Disease?
  • Is your child/adolescent between the ages of 2-18 years?
  • Does your child take vitamins?
  • Would you like to be part of a national survey?
  • Only 20 minutes of your time!

Complete the survey online:

http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/celiacvitd/vitamin-use-in-children-with-celiac-disease/